MARRCREATIVE
MARRCREATIVE
 
Kentucky farmer Judy Wilson, second from right, has put some of her Mississippi River bottomland in a conservation easement to restore trees and habitat for the central flyway.

Kentucky farmer Judy Wilson, second from right, has put some of her Mississippi River bottomland in a conservation easement to restore trees and habitat for the central flyway.

 

WHAT CONSERVATION LOOKS LIKE

 

These stories are just a few my staff and I launched while I was with The Nature Conservancy as director of photography. It was essential to give the public a better visual idea of some of TNC’s smart projects: How to portray farmers who keep our water clean? How to share the results of 15 years of planting trees in Brazil? How to introduce a group of young people employed in Gulf Coast restoration work?

Nature is a solution for our warming climate.

People make it happen.

A GulfCorp team clears undergrowth on Florida’s “Forgotten Coast” near Apalachicola.

A GulfCorp team clears undergrowth on Florida’s “Forgotten Coast” near Apalachicola.

 
 

Growing Forests, one Tree at a Time

Decades of planting trees in Brazil—one sapling at a time—are restoring some of the forests essential to Amazon habitat and carbon sequestration. But trees are also essential to the health of the watershed in the Mantiqueira Mountains—they keep the rivers in the watershed clear and flowing, providing 12 million people in Sao Paulo clean, fresh water. Photographer Felipe Fittipaldi was asked to take us close to the replanting process, finding character in the planting crews and the individual saplings that will grow into a diverse forest.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY FELIPE FITTIPALDI

 

Farmer Heroes

Many of the people who provide us good food also keep our water clean and protect crucial habitats. Yet we rarely meet them. And what they do rarely makes a good photograph. Photographer Rob Clark was assigned to create a set of portraits of these farmers—all heroes in their own way.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ROBERT CLARK

 

Creating Jobs, Restoring Coastlines

The Nature Conservancy’s GulfCorps program provides jobs and conservation training for young people while restoring coastal resiliency and habitat from Florida to Texas.


PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOHN STANMEYER


 

Growing Fuel

Huge swaths of forest are decimated every year for the charcoal trade in Africa eliminating trees and habitat. Charcoal is used for cooking and heating fuel. These Kenyan women are participating in a project searching for a sustainable solution for fuel needs—growing bamboo, making it into charcoal and taking it to market.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY TATE DRUCKER

 

2 Hours, 20 Volunteers, 2000 Pounds of Plastic

A few months after Hurricane Harvey hit the Houston area, volunteers turned out to help clear trash from the Galveston Bay shoreline of The Nature Conservancy’s Texas City Preserve.

TIMELAPSE BY ROBERT CLARK

 

Preserving, Protecting the Great and the Small

Setting aside land from development is crucial to expand habitat and migration corridors. The Nature Conservancy’s Dangermond Preserve sits at the crossroads between Northern and Southern California ecosystems connecting old growth oaks and unique marine preserves near Point Conception. The large landscapes provide scale and sense of environment, but the discovery of the smaller world through David Liittschwager’s vision takes the viewer to an unexpected place.

Photographs by DAVID LIITTSCHWAGER

and BILL MARR

 

The Power of Photographs

Photographer Rob Clark: “I want people to turn the page… and stop.”